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Arguing with Nature

Feb 28 '14
scienceyoucanlove:

ramblingmage:

kyrafic:

coldswarkids:

edwardspoonhands:

thelegendofkungjew:

doxian:

d-dinosaur:

rknjl:

newvagabond:

NO “TELEPHONES”. TALK TO EACH OTHER. FACE TO FACE ONLY. WRITE A LETTER. SEND A TELEGRAM TO YOUR MOM. PRETEND IT’S 1860. LIVE.

NO ‘WRITING’… TALK TO EACH OTHER. THROW A ROCK AT YOUR MOM. PRETEND IT’S 10,000 BCE.  LIVE.

URGGA. ROU GRAAURH. RUH.
<SMACKS HANDS ON WALL WITH PAINT.>

NO ‘HIGHER BRAIN FUNCTIONS’ …USE YOUR REPTILIAN BRAIN
EAT YOUR MOM’S CORPSE SHE DIED TO PROVIDE YOU WITH SUSTENANCE
PRETEND YOU HAVE JUST AROSE FROM THE SEA
SURVIVE

NO “MULTICELLULAR TRAITS”….. USE YOUR SYMBIOTIC MITOCHONDRIA
REPRODUCE ASEXUALLY, YOU’RE YOUR OWN PARENT
PRETEND IT’S 2BYA
EVOLVE

NO “LIFE.” USE FUNDAMENTAL PHYSICAL FORCES TO FORM SPHERICAL OBJECTS REVOLVING AROUND ONE ANOTHER IN SPACE. 
FUSE HYDROGEN INTO HELIUM USING GRAVITATIONAL PRESSURE TO PRODUCE HEAT AND LIGHT. 
PRETEND IT’S 4.5BYA.
STABILIZE INTO EQUILIBRIA

NO “MATTER”.  EXIST IN THE VOID WITHOUT PURPOSE OR MEANING.
THERE IS NO “YOU”, ONLY THE VAST CONCEPT OF NOTHING.
TIME DOES NOT EXIST.
BE.

This has gotten 5,000 times awesomer than last time it came through my dash.

Oh my gods. It got better!

this is beautiful 

scienceyoucanlove:

ramblingmage:

kyrafic:

coldswarkids:

edwardspoonhands:

thelegendofkungjew:

doxian:

d-dinosaur:

rknjl:

newvagabond:

NO “TELEPHONES”. TALK TO EACH OTHER. FACE TO FACE ONLY. WRITE A LETTER. SEND A TELEGRAM TO YOUR MOM. PRETEND IT’S 1860. LIVE.

NO ‘WRITING’… TALK TO EACH OTHER. THROW A ROCK AT YOUR MOM. PRETEND IT’S 10,000 BCE.  LIVE.

URGGA. ROU GRAAURH. RUH.

<SMACKS HANDS ON WALL WITH PAINT.>

NO ‘HIGHER BRAIN FUNCTIONS’ …USE YOUR REPTILIAN BRAIN

EAT YOUR MOM’S CORPSE SHE DIED TO PROVIDE YOU WITH SUSTENANCE

PRETEND YOU HAVE JUST AROSE FROM THE SEA

SURVIVE

NO “MULTICELLULAR TRAITS”….. USE YOUR SYMBIOTIC MITOCHONDRIA

REPRODUCE ASEXUALLY, YOU’RE YOUR OWN PARENT

PRETEND IT’S 2BYA

EVOLVE

NO “LIFE.” USE FUNDAMENTAL PHYSICAL FORCES TO FORM SPHERICAL OBJECTS REVOLVING AROUND ONE ANOTHER IN SPACE. 

FUSE HYDROGEN INTO HELIUM USING GRAVITATIONAL PRESSURE TO PRODUCE HEAT AND LIGHT. 

PRETEND IT’S 4.5BYA.

STABILIZE INTO EQUILIBRIA

NO “MATTER”.  EXIST IN THE VOID WITHOUT PURPOSE OR MEANING.

THERE IS NO “YOU”, ONLY THE VAST CONCEPT OF NOTHING.

TIME DOES NOT EXIST.

BE.

This has gotten 5,000 times awesomer than last time it came through my dash.

Oh my gods. It got better!

this is beautiful 

(Source: agirlandhisplatypus)

529,466 notes (via scienceyoucanlove & agirlandhisplatypus)

Jan 27 '14
dendroica:

Microbeads a major problem in L.A. River

Scientist Marcus Eriksen stood ankle deep in the murky Los Angeles River on Friday and dipped a net into the water, looking for a problem. Eriksen was searching for “microbeads,” bits of plastic no bigger than salt grains that absorb toxins such as motor oil and insecticides as they tumble downstream and into the Pacific Ocean.
The tiny polyethylene and polypropylene beads are an emerging concern among scientists and environmentalists. The beads come mostly from personal care products such as facial exfoliants and body washes. They are not biodegradable, however, and because they are not removed easily by wastewater treatment plants, they flow out to sea and enter the food chain.
"Microplastic is now a ubiquitous contaminant in the Pacific Ocean — and seas around the world," said Eriksen, a scientist with the 5 Gyres Institute, a nonprofit dedicated to researching plastics in the world’s waterways. "We believe that 80% of it comes from coastal watersheds like Los Angeles."
Eriksen is just starting to test the Los Angeles River to determine if it holds microbeads, and if so, their source. On Friday, he found what he was looking for in about 10 minutes. Near the confluence of the river and Arroyo Seco, about three miles north of downtown, Eriksen found a handful of algae and wriggling leeches speckled with tiny filaments, shards and beads that could have come from myriad sources: laundry wastewater, degraded plastic bags, stir sticks, personal care products.
"The scary thing is that the beads sponge up toxins, then get consumed by organisms from shellfish to crabs to fish" later eaten by humans, he said.
Scientists are only beginning to understand the hazards posed by microplastic pollution in the world’s oceans and inland waterways. In 2012, Eriksen and a team of researchers discovered large amounts of microbeads and other microplastic pollution in the Great Lakes. Those findings prompted a coalition of mayors of Great Lakes cities to ask the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to determine the possible health risks to lake ecosystems and humans.
A year later, 5 Gyres launched a campaign asking the manufacturers of personal care products to remove plastic microbeads and replace them with nonplastic alternatives such as crushed walnut husks and apricot kernels that will degrade naturally. Several companies have agreed to phase microbeads out of their product lines.
In a statement, the Johnson &amp; Johnson Family of Consumer Companies, for example, said it has “stopped developing new products containing polyethylene microbeads.” The company expects by 2015 to have replaced microbeads with alternatives in half the products that currently use them.

(via latimes.com)

dendroica:

Microbeads a major problem in L.A. River

Scientist Marcus Eriksen stood ankle deep in the murky Los Angeles River on Friday and dipped a net into the water, looking for a problem. Eriksen was searching for “microbeads,” bits of plastic no bigger than salt grains that absorb toxins such as motor oil and insecticides as they tumble downstream and into the Pacific Ocean.

The tiny polyethylene and polypropylene beads are an emerging concern among scientists and environmentalists. The beads come mostly from personal care products such as facial exfoliants and body washes. They are not biodegradable, however, and because they are not removed easily by wastewater treatment plants, they flow out to sea and enter the food chain.

"Microplastic is now a ubiquitous contaminant in the Pacific Ocean — and seas around the world," said Eriksen, a scientist with the 5 Gyres Institute, a nonprofit dedicated to researching plastics in the world’s waterways. "We believe that 80% of it comes from coastal watersheds like Los Angeles."

Eriksen is just starting to test the Los Angeles River to determine if it holds microbeads, and if so, their source. On Friday, he found what he was looking for in about 10 minutes. Near the confluence of the river and Arroyo Seco, about three miles north of downtown, Eriksen found a handful of algae and wriggling leeches speckled with tiny filaments, shards and beads that could have come from myriad sources: laundry wastewater, degraded plastic bags, stir sticks, personal care products.

"The scary thing is that the beads sponge up toxins, then get consumed by organisms from shellfish to crabs to fish" later eaten by humans, he said.

Scientists are only beginning to understand the hazards posed by microplastic pollution in the world’s oceans and inland waterways. In 2012, Eriksen and a team of researchers discovered large amounts of microbeads and other microplastic pollution in the Great Lakes. Those findings prompted a coalition of mayors of Great Lakes cities to ask the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to determine the possible health risks to lake ecosystems and humans.

A year later, 5 Gyres launched a campaign asking the manufacturers of personal care products to remove plastic microbeads and replace them with nonplastic alternatives such as crushed walnut husks and apricot kernels that will degrade naturally. Several companies have agreed to phase microbeads out of their product lines.

In a statement, the Johnson & Johnson Family of Consumer Companies, for example, said it has “stopped developing new products containing polyethylene microbeads.” The company expects by 2015 to have replaced microbeads with alternatives in half the products that currently use them.

(via latimes.com)

410 notes (via somuchscience & dendroica)

Jan 27 '14

(Source: pacificasun)

699 notes (via underthevastblueseas & pacificasun)

Jan 24 '14
kihaku-gato:

hyggehaven:

bestofthegarden:

Hardy Bananas for the Midwest - by Denise Schreiber
In Pittsburgh, right up until the hard frost, we had bananas growing here. Yes you heard me right, bananas with those big leaves and tropical look. And they will return again next spring.
This particular banana is called hardy Japanese fiber banana (Musa basjoo). It is native to the Ryukyu Islands of Japan, and it can be grown in the ground in most parts of the Midwest.  As you dream of exciting new plants to add to next year’s garden, consider buying Musa basjoo. It is a little like adding a bit of Hawaii to your own Zone 5 or 6 backyard …
» Read “Hardy Bananas for the Midwest” at sbsmags.com

WHAT

It’s no lie =P I have heard many sources succeed with growing them in such cold zones, though I am sad to say I haven’t gotten a chance to proove it in my own gardens (yet… &gt;.&gt; )
It’s kind of hard to design a regular garden with a tropical like a banana though lol.

kihaku-gato:

hyggehaven:

bestofthegarden:

Hardy Bananas for the Midwest
- by Denise Schreiber

In Pittsburgh, right up until the hard frost, we had bananas growing here. Yes you heard me right, bananas with those big leaves and tropical look. And they will return again next spring.

This particular banana is called hardy Japanese fiber banana (Musa basjoo). It is native to the Ryukyu Islands of Japan, and it can be grown in the ground in most parts of the Midwest.  As you dream of exciting new plants to add to next year’s garden, consider buying Musa basjoo. It is a little like adding a bit of Hawaii to your own Zone 5 or 6 backyard …

» Read “Hardy Bananas for the Midwest” at sbsmags.com

WHAT

It’s no lie =P I have heard many sources succeed with growing them in such cold zones, though I am sad to say I haven’t gotten a chance to proove it in my own gardens (yet… >.> )

It’s kind of hard to design a regular garden with a tropical like a banana though lol.

21 notes (via kihaku-gato & bestofthegarden)

Jan 24 '14

(Source: pacificasun)

699 notes (via underthevastblueseas & pacificasun)

Jan 8 '14

jtotheizzoe:

NEW VIDEO! Hopefully this will keep your brain warm because it’s cold in Amurika today.

This one is about snowflakes. And science. Snowflake science. So many “s” sounds! Stupendous!

Check out the rest of my videos over on the channel page and consider freezing your tongue to the subscribe button, everyone’s doing it.

501 notes (via somuchscience & jtotheizzoe)Tags: Thanks Florida So Amazing

Jan 1 '14

598 notes (via griseus)

Dec 27 '13

wildcat2030:

The Incredible Physics of Ants

ScienceTake: They can flow like a liquid and bounce back like a solid. Masses of fire ants show a duality that intrigues physicists.

(by The New York Times)

518 notes (via somuchscience & wildcat2030)

Dec 20 '13

plant-a-day:

Photos courtesy of Stan Shebs, Michael Wolf (1) (2), and Scott Zona.

Agave vilmoriniana aka Octopus Agave. Family Asparagaceae. Native to northwest Mexico and southwest United States. Hardy in zones 7b-11. 

48 notes (via plant-a-day)

Dec 17 '13
kihaku-gato:

where-my-sidewalk-ends:

This image is an example of guttation, the exudation of tiny drops of sap that accumulate on the tips or edges of leaves.

Actually I got to learn about this phenomena in Horticulture class (albeit quickly so excuse me if I miss any vital points);
Photosynthesis, as one would know, occurs only when light/day is present, but Translocation of water (movement of water up the stem) is always occurring in a plant regardless of the photoperiod (amount of light or time of day). So at night (or even on cloudy days) where a plant isn’t going to use the water for photosynthesis or to cool off from the heat of the sun, all that excess water still has to go somewhere since it’s still constantly flowing up the stem, so some of it ends up overflowing at the ends of the leaf veins (notice that the guttation droplets in that pic are only at the tips of the leafs serrates where the vein ends at the leaf margin).
Actually I have seen guttation occur on my Banana plants some winters in my apartment, mostly in the morning or on cloudy days =) nice to have learned why they always did that lol

kihaku-gato:

where-my-sidewalk-ends:

This image is an example of guttation, the exudation of tiny drops of sap that accumulate on the tips or edges of leaves.

Actually I got to learn about this phenomena in Horticulture class (albeit quickly so excuse me if I miss any vital points);

Photosynthesis, as one would know, occurs only when light/day is present, but Translocation of water (movement of water up the stem) is always occurring in a plant regardless of the photoperiod (amount of light or time of day). So at night (or even on cloudy days) where a plant isn’t going to use the water for photosynthesis or to cool off from the heat of the sun, all that excess water still has to go somewhere since it’s still constantly flowing up the stem, so some of it ends up overflowing at the ends of the leaf veins (notice that the guttation droplets in that pic are only at the tips of the leafs serrates where the vein ends at the leaf margin).

Actually I have seen guttation occur on my Banana plants some winters in my apartment, mostly in the morning or on cloudy days =) nice to have learned why they always did that lol

184 notes (via kihaku-gato & where-my-sidewalk-ends)